Our Story

Steve and Gayle Ganser started on their dream in 1979 when they purchased farmland in Maxatawny Township.   A year later they were married and built their home.  At that time Steve was a horticultural researcher for Rodale Experimental Farm and Gayle was a sales rep for Breyer’s ice cream.  In 1983 Steve lost his job at Rodale and Eagle Point Farm was born.  Their first venture was selling baby vegetables to a distributor in Phoenixville.  These vegetables were distributed all over the world to five star restaurants like Tavern on the Green in New York.  At the same time their first child Joseph was born.  In addition to the baby vegetables they established a local restaurant run and also a  “huckster route” to 600 homes and three senior citizens complexes in Allentown and Whitehall.  While still producing baby squashes, edible flowers and haricot vertes (baby green beans), they started to grow a more diverse selection of fruits and vegetables.  These same fruits, like melons and vegetables, everything from asparagus to zucchini are still their mainstay today.

Steve and Gayle’s growing philosophy has always been about sustainability and being good stewards of their land,  even before those were popular catch phrases.  As a researcher Steve learned and tested many growing methods that they still incorporate today.  When people ask them about being “green’ its hard for them not to answer “We are literally the original”green” industry.”  Their goal is to continue with this philosophy in not only their fruit and vegetable production but also the greenhouses and how they operate their retail location.

As they were developing their farm, they were also actively searching for the perfect location to open their farm market. Then in 1986 they not only purchased their store’s  present location but their second child Monica was born. They opened the retail business in 1987.

Those early years  Steve and Gayle continued to deliver to area restaurants and joined the area’s first Farmers’ Market, Lehigh Growers Market in Allentown.  Along with nine other growers they set up every Saturday from July through October  for three years.  After the lease was cancelled and the group could not find a close location like Emmaus or Macungie, the market settled in Coopersburg, where it still runs today.  However, the Gansers chose not to  move with them but decided to concentrate on their Route 100 location only.

Since that time their  children have grown as well as the business which now includes four greenhouses, a season extender high tunnel,  a busy Christmas season, wreath making and gift baskets , and a CSA with St. Luke’s Hospital in addition to their sustainable fruit and vegetable growing.